Tagged: Power

HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Gymgoer has to call firefighters to slice up dumbbell weight he had managed to get his PENIS stuck in while training …


Daily Mail

Gymgoer has to call firefighters to slice up dumbbell weight he had managed to get his PENIS stuck in while training
Daily Mail
A man who stuck his penis in a dumbbell weight spent three hours surrounded by firefighters who sliced him free with power tools. Angle grinders, a saw and a hydraulic rescue tool usually used to prize crash victims from vehicle wreckage were used to …
Man gets penis stuck in gym weight plate – it takes firefighters three hours to cut him free with power toolsMirror.co.uk

усі статті новин: 80 »

0

How To Up Your Fitness, Fast – Without Spending On A Gym Membership – HuffPost UK

Summer might be coming to an end but that doesn’t mean your workouts have to slow down. When autumn rolls around and the evenings get dark, it’s nice to head to a warm gym to keep fit. But what if you don’t fancy giving a third of your take-home pay to your local gym?

Never fear. There are alternatives that don’t involve fighting another gym-goer for the treadmill. You don’t even have to get dressed to try out kettlebell exercises at home in your pyjamas. Take your fitness to the next level and save pennies while you’re at it.

Todor Tsvetkov via Getty Images

Kettlebells

When you’re short on time and you don’t want to get dressed to workout, try kettlebell exercises at home. A kettlebell is a cast iron weight that looks like a cannonball with a handle. You can use them for strength and cardiovascular exercise. Swinging a kettlebell around is seriously hard work. You’ll work up a proper sweat while burning calories and toning muscles.

Cecilie_Arcurs via Getty Images

Wild swimming

Swimming pools can be pricey and they are often filled with screaming children. If you don’t mind braving the cold, find your local wild swimming spot and go for a dip. Hampstead Ponds is a famous wild swimming lake in London and is a lot cheaper than regular pool, at £2 a dip. 

Swimming is a low-impact workout so it’s great if you are recovering from an injury, plus you’ll start to see your fitness improve in a whole new way. Take a look at the Wild Swimming[1] website for local swimming ponds near you.

Johner Images via Getty Images

Plenty of cities have pay-as-you-ride bikes now, making it cheaper than ever to go cycling. It’s fantastic for building cardiovascular fitness and toning your muscles. Regular short cycle rides are the best way to get fit. Start biking twice a week and gradually build it up – before long you’ll be that person powering uphill on your bike with legs of steel.

NKS_Imagery via Getty Images

Tennis doesn’t have to involve signing up to an expensive club. Whacking a ball around is one of the best ways to get fit while having fun. Tennis is all about quick explosive movements and dynamic strength, plus it builds stamina and encourages coordination. There are dozens of free access tennis courts around the country. Some even offer free coaching for families. Find your nearest free tennis court on the Tennis For Free[2] website.

gilaxia via Getty Images

While not traditionally thought of as a fitness regime, yoga can be an intense workout if you practice the right style. Ashtanga and vinyasa style yoga not only stretches muscles but also strengthens your core and tones your upper and lower body. A one-hour vinyasa class burns nearly 600 calories. You can easily practice yoga at home by following YouTube videos or join a pay-monthly site. Try Yoga With Adriene’s 45-minute Power Yoga class[3] for starters. 

Portra via Getty Images

All you need to start running is a pair of trainers. The beauty of pacing pavements is you can do it anywhere – whether it’s on your commute to work or along the coastal path on holiday. Start with a short 10 minute jog and slowly build up to 30-40 minutes. Don’t berate yourself if you have to walk.

Just challenge yourself, next time, to run a little further. Running is the perfect fitness regime if you want to see results fast and it is totally free.

Hoxton/Ryan Lees via Getty Images

HIIT stands for high-intensity interval training. It involves short bursts of exercise that you can do at home to build strength, stamina and increase your metabolism. Fitness Blender[4] is one of our favourite YouTube channels for HIIT exercises. You can choose different length workouts, from quick 10-minute cardio sessions to kickboxing and skipping. You don’t need any special equipment and you won’t have to pay a penny. If the sun is shining, take that HIIT regime outside and do it in your local park.

skynesher via Getty Images

References

  1. ^ Wild Swimming (www.wildswimming.co.uk)
  2. ^ Tennis For Free (tennisforfree.com)
  3. ^ Power Yoga class (www.youtube.com)
  4. ^ Fitness Blender (www.fitnessblender.com)
  5. ^ Suggest a correction (www.huffingtonpost.co.uk)
HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

You Don’t Need Any Equipment For This 2-Move Total-Body Workout

Trainer: Jeremy Scott, trainer at Jeremy Scott Fitness in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Benefit: Pushups work your chest, shoulders, triceps, and core. Squats challenge your glutes, hamstrings and quads. Combine the two with plyometric variations, and you’ll build total-body strength and power while melting fat, Scott says.

0

Work out your body (and mind) with this 5-minute boxing reset from Ashley Guarrasi

Athleta Ribbon - 2

What to do when your sanity needs a sweat sesh, but making it to the studio is just not going to happen? Sweat Series is here to help! We partnered with Athleta[1] and asked the industry’s hottest instructors and fit-stagrammers to give us their quickest—and hardest—do-anywhere workouts. So, get pumped! (On your own schedule.)

Finding a workout you love is so much more than getting in a good sweat: “It’s about finding that cathartic time that relieves your stress, boosts your mood, and makes you feel confident,” explains Ashley Guarrasi, a founding trainer at Rumble boxing studio.

For her it was boxing—and in the video above, you can see why. With energetic power-jabs, powered-up core-targeting planks, and a feeling of instant gratification when you finally hit that bag, boxing is as much an emotional workout as it as physical one. (And don’t worry, you won’t be without a serious sweat sesh: “This workout will seriously work your entire body—from your arms and core and to every muscle in you your leg.”)

Even if you’re a newbie, Guarassi says, the workout shouldn’t be intimidating. “It’s all about letting go of anything, everything—you can be whoever you want inside the ring,” she explains.

So make some room and get ready for this full-body (and mind) workout from Ashley Guarrasi.

And check out the rest of our butt-kicking Sweat Series workouts here.[2]

Get the Athleta look:

Ashley is wearing:
High Neck Shadow Stripe Chi Tank,[3] $44
Colorblock Spliced Sonar 7/8 Tight,[4] $84

References

  1. ^ Athleta (ad.doubleclick.net)
  2. ^ here. (www.wellandgood.com)
  3. ^ High Neck Shadow Stripe Chi Tank, (athleta.gap.com)
  4. ^ Colorblock Spliced Sonar 7/8 Tight, (athleta.gap.com)
0

Why L-Arginine Isn’t Such a Great Pre-Workout

We know – the world of fitness supplements can be confusing.

You probably know that protein powder is an easy way to reach your calorie and macronutrient goals and that creatine[1] is a safe and effective way to increase power and anaerobic capacity.

That’s roughly where the consensus ends when it comes to fitness supplements, and for those of us looking to improve workout performance, it can be hard to know what else meets the approval of the scientific community at large.

Enter L-arginine[2], (also just called “arginine”) an amino acid that’s been linked to everything from better workouts to stronger erections. Can it improve your PRs, or is it just another well-packaged bottle of powdered snake oil?

The Claims

As a conditionally essential amino acid, the body does a decent job of producing arginine on its own, but there could be some situations where it’s useful to supplement it.

The most common claim surrounding arginine is its purported abilities of vasolidation, meaning that it “opens up” veins and arteries and makes it easier for blood to flow freely throughout your body. This would be because it is a precursor to nitric oxide[3], a known vasolidator.

Following on from that claim, arginine should be able to improve workout performance and decrease the odds of experiencing hypertension, deep vein thrombosis, erectile dysfunction, and other problems that are related to blood flow.

That is, if it’s true.

The Evidence

“L-arginine tends to be marketed towards any physical activity, since the theoretical increase in nitric oxide should benefit anything related to blood flow,” says Kurtis Frank, the research director of the independent nutrition research organization, Examine.com. “For the most part, it seems to favor CrossFit®-style activities; things that involve muscular contraction in a moderate rep range. It doesn’t seem to provide any major benefit to long distance stuff nor maximal power activities like sprinting and heavy lifting.”

When it comes to nitric oxide supplements, there’s something of a “Big Four”: L-arginine, L-citrulline, agmatine, and nitrates. Antioxidants also indirectly aid nitric oxide and are often used alongside the Big Four.

The problem, in Frank’s own words, is that arginine is the “shittiest” nitric oxide supplement of the bunch. It’s not even worth taking it with the other NO supplements, since they’d be competing for the same mechanism. If taken side by side, he explains, it’d end up being a one-plus-one-plus-one equals one-type scenario.

The question, then, is what’s the smartest way to boost nitric oxide?

 “I’d recommend L-citrulline or agmatine over L-arginine any day, for workouts and for the general health benefits,” says Frank. “Agmatine could be seen as the healthiest, since it has other mechanisms in addition to the NO production, like neuronal health.”

Focusing on L-citrulline or agmatine is also likely to benefit your wallet, since dedicated nitric oxide supplements are notorious for trying to increase profits by adding twenty somewhat relevant ingredients, while they usually only have a couple of ingredients that are truly effective. (Frank likens NO supplements to “fat burners” in that regard.)

Arginine, it turns out, is a weak pick for the benefits a buyer is probably after. The link it has to actually boosting nitric oxide is weak, and the initial belief that it’s a solid NO supplement is sometimes known as “The Arginine paradox.”

“L-arginine was initially thought to increase NO because it’s a precursor – you need some arginine for the enzymes that make NO,” says Frank. “But when you put more arginine into a system, NO doesn’t necessarily increase. It turned out that’s because it’s not just a substrate, it works mostly through the A2-andrenergic receptor. Agmatine is a lot more potent in the way it acts on this receptor, and L-citrulline, while it works in a more similar manner to L-arginine, does a much better job of absorbing through the intestines. By the way, that’s why a lot of people get ‘pre-workout’ shits; they combine caffeine with L-arginine, both of which can go right through you.”

But Doesn’t L-Arginine Increase My Muscle Size?

Finally, L-arginine is also thought by many to increase the body’s production of the anabolic human growth hormone[4] (HGH) and creatine.

But arginine doesn’t do anything for your creatine production unless you’re already deficient in arginine, and it’s extremely unlikely that you are. (Remember that the body can make its own arginine, plus it’s present in most sources of protein.)

And as far as growth hormone goes, arginine and creatine do technically increase its production after a workout, but for such a small time frame that it’s doubtful it’ll have any practical effect on your body. So don’t turn to L-arginine to give you Stallone-like[5] HGH levels.

The Takeaway

This science is a little dense, but here’s the take-home lesson.

First, if lowering your risk of hypertension by improving your blood flow, you’re better off talking to your doctor and considering pharmaceuticals and ACE inhibitors. Supplements, after all, aren’t medications.

But, if you’re interested in a nitric oxide-boosting, blood vessel-opening pre-workout supplement, you’re better off turning to L-citrulline or agmatine, the latter of which might be the better choice. About three grams per day of either is a safe and effective dose.

Featured image via @_king_tunde_[6]

Comments

References

  1. ^ creatine (barbend.com)
  2. ^ L-arginine (examine.com)
  3. ^ nitric oxide (examine.com)
  4. ^ human growth hormone (barbend.com)
  5. ^ Stallone-like (www.vanityfair.com)
  6. ^ @_king_tunde_ (instagram.com)