Tagged: Nutrition

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Pumpkin smoothie

Making your own pumpkin puree is an arduous task. Instead, purchase 100% pure pumpkin puree, on which pumpkin is listed as the only ingredient, at your local grocery store. This is different from the pumpkin pie filling which is laden with added sugar,…

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2 Experts Explain How Your Diet Needs to Change When You Lift Weights


POPSUGAR UK

2 Experts Explain How Your Diet Needs to Change When You Lift Weights
POPSUGAR UK
“It’s essential to know that nutrition has a significant impact on your results,” Dr. Luiza Petre, board-certified cardiologist and weight-management specialist, told POPSUGAR. If you’re lifting weights in an attempt to build muscle mass, Dr. Petre

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Business Awards: Urban Jungle launches new shop selling fitness supplements and sportswear

Fitness company Urban Jungle has teamed up with online sport and nutrition specialists Renegade Supplements to open a new shop.[1]

The firm has launched the new venture at its base at the old Town Hall, in Fenton, as part of an ongoing investment programme.

Urban Jungle was launched in 2016 by Simon Dyer as an alternative way of training and exercise, focusing on strength and fitness workouts.

Now the company is entering The Sentinel Business Awards[2] in the Small Business of the Year category, sponsored by Beswicks Legal.

Simon said: “We sell a lot of clothes, before we had to get them printed and order them in. At the same time, we offer our clients advise on nutrition and healthier ways of living.

“So we decided to bring everything in house to allow us to provide an all-round service.”

The new store boasts a range of fitness wear as well as supplements used to help aid recovery after a workout and healthy snacks.

Simon Dyer, founder of Fenton-based fitness company Urban Jungle

Simon said: “One thing we have learned over the last 12 to 18 months is that while people have made the effort to change their way of life, they cannot change overnight which means they are still looking for things like crisps and chocolate bars to snack on – that’s why we are offering a healthier alternative.”

Today, Urban Jungle has 750 members and 16 in-house trainers which stage 32 classes a week, but the number of classes is set to double over the next 12 months with the introduction of spinning, squatting, dance and street fighter classes.

Simon added: “Over the last couple of years we have been focusing on our four-year business plan which is working really well.”

“We have also worked hard on establishing and building our brand and at the moment every penny we make is being re-invested back into the business.”

References

  1. ^ open a new shop. (www.stokesentinel.co.uk)
  2. ^ The Sentinel Business Awards (www.stokesentinel.co.uk)
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Why L-Arginine Isn’t Such a Great Pre-Workout

We know – the world of fitness supplements can be confusing.

You probably know that protein powder is an easy way to reach your calorie and macronutrient goals and that creatine[1] is a safe and effective way to increase power and anaerobic capacity.

That’s roughly where the consensus ends when it comes to fitness supplements, and for those of us looking to improve workout performance, it can be hard to know what else meets the approval of the scientific community at large.

Enter L-arginine[2], (also just called “arginine”) an amino acid that’s been linked to everything from better workouts to stronger erections. Can it improve your PRs, or is it just another well-packaged bottle of powdered snake oil?

The Claims

As a conditionally essential amino acid, the body does a decent job of producing arginine on its own, but there could be some situations where it’s useful to supplement it.

The most common claim surrounding arginine is its purported abilities of vasolidation, meaning that it “opens up” veins and arteries and makes it easier for blood to flow freely throughout your body. This would be because it is a precursor to nitric oxide[3], a known vasolidator.

Following on from that claim, arginine should be able to improve workout performance and decrease the odds of experiencing hypertension, deep vein thrombosis, erectile dysfunction, and other problems that are related to blood flow.

That is, if it’s true.

The Evidence

“L-arginine tends to be marketed towards any physical activity, since the theoretical increase in nitric oxide should benefit anything related to blood flow,” says Kurtis Frank, the research director of the independent nutrition research organization, Examine.com. “For the most part, it seems to favor CrossFit®-style activities; things that involve muscular contraction in a moderate rep range. It doesn’t seem to provide any major benefit to long distance stuff nor maximal power activities like sprinting and heavy lifting.”

When it comes to nitric oxide supplements, there’s something of a “Big Four”: L-arginine, L-citrulline, agmatine, and nitrates. Antioxidants also indirectly aid nitric oxide and are often used alongside the Big Four.

The problem, in Frank’s own words, is that arginine is the “shittiest” nitric oxide supplement of the bunch. It’s not even worth taking it with the other NO supplements, since they’d be competing for the same mechanism. If taken side by side, he explains, it’d end up being a one-plus-one-plus-one equals one-type scenario.

The question, then, is what’s the smartest way to boost nitric oxide?

 “I’d recommend L-citrulline or agmatine over L-arginine any day, for workouts and for the general health benefits,” says Frank. “Agmatine could be seen as the healthiest, since it has other mechanisms in addition to the NO production, like neuronal health.”

Focusing on L-citrulline or agmatine is also likely to benefit your wallet, since dedicated nitric oxide supplements are notorious for trying to increase profits by adding twenty somewhat relevant ingredients, while they usually only have a couple of ingredients that are truly effective. (Frank likens NO supplements to “fat burners” in that regard.)

Arginine, it turns out, is a weak pick for the benefits a buyer is probably after. The link it has to actually boosting nitric oxide is weak, and the initial belief that it’s a solid NO supplement is sometimes known as “The Arginine paradox.”

“L-arginine was initially thought to increase NO because it’s a precursor – you need some arginine for the enzymes that make NO,” says Frank. “But when you put more arginine into a system, NO doesn’t necessarily increase. It turned out that’s because it’s not just a substrate, it works mostly through the A2-andrenergic receptor. Agmatine is a lot more potent in the way it acts on this receptor, and L-citrulline, while it works in a more similar manner to L-arginine, does a much better job of absorbing through the intestines. By the way, that’s why a lot of people get ‘pre-workout’ shits; they combine caffeine with L-arginine, both of which can go right through you.”

But Doesn’t L-Arginine Increase My Muscle Size?

Finally, L-arginine is also thought by many to increase the body’s production of the anabolic human growth hormone[4] (HGH) and creatine.

But arginine doesn’t do anything for your creatine production unless you’re already deficient in arginine, and it’s extremely unlikely that you are. (Remember that the body can make its own arginine, plus it’s present in most sources of protein.)

And as far as growth hormone goes, arginine and creatine do technically increase its production after a workout, but for such a small time frame that it’s doubtful it’ll have any practical effect on your body. So don’t turn to L-arginine to give you Stallone-like[5] HGH levels.

The Takeaway

This science is a little dense, but here’s the take-home lesson.

First, if lowering your risk of hypertension by improving your blood flow, you’re better off talking to your doctor and considering pharmaceuticals and ACE inhibitors. Supplements, after all, aren’t medications.

But, if you’re interested in a nitric oxide-boosting, blood vessel-opening pre-workout supplement, you’re better off turning to L-citrulline or agmatine, the latter of which might be the better choice. About three grams per day of either is a safe and effective dose.

Featured image via @_king_tunde_[6]

Comments

References

  1. ^ creatine (barbend.com)
  2. ^ L-arginine (examine.com)
  3. ^ nitric oxide (examine.com)
  4. ^ human growth hormone (barbend.com)
  5. ^ Stallone-like (www.vanityfair.com)
  6. ^ @_king_tunde_ (instagram.com)
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Who Should Take Gelatin Supplements? Could Aid Recovery From …

We may associate gelatin with our favorite gummy snacks and Jello desserts, but new research[1] suggests there may be a health benefit to adding more of this animal byproduct to your diet. According to the research, now published the January issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, consuming a gelatin supplement, plus a burst of intensive exercise, can help build ligaments, tendons and bones.

The research found that gelatin supplement increased blood levels of amino acids and markers linked to collagen synthesis in human subjects and improved the mechanics of the engineered lab-grown ligaments. Those results led the team to determine that gelatin supplements may be helpful for athletes, elderly individuals, and others who may need more flexibility and joint support.

Read: Joint Pain Could Affect Your Lover’s Sleep[2]

“These data suggest that adding gelatin and vitamin C to an intermittent exercise program could play a beneficial role in injury prevention and tissue repair,” the researchers wrote[3].

gummy The main ingredient in our favorite gummy snacks may have an added health benefit. Photo Courtesy of Pixabay

For their study, the team analyzed both the effect of gelatin supplements on human volunteers, and on artificially grown ligaments to get a closer look at what was going occuring on inside of the body. A total of 8 healthy male volunteers drank a gelatin supplement enhanced with vitamin. Afterwards, the volunteers had their blood taken before and after performing short 5 minute intervals of high-impact exercises (skipping) for an hour .

The researchers believe their findings suggest that gelatin supplements may be useful prevent injury and enhance recovery.

Of course, one does not have to take supplement in order to get a more gelatin into their diet. Bone soups, which are made from boiling down either fish or animal bones, contain large amounts of gelatin as well, in addition to a variety of other important vitamins and nutrients. In addition to gelatin, bone broth also has collagen which also aids in skeletal support.

Source: Shaw G, Lee-Barthel A, Ross MLR, Wang B, Baar K. Vitamin C–enriched gelatin supplementation before intermittent activity augments collagen synthesis. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . 2016

See Also:

4 Reasons You Should Be Drinking Bone Broth Every Day[4]

6 Foods You Think Are Vegetarian But Aren’t[5]

References

  1. ^ research (ajcn.nutrition.org)
  2. ^ Joint Pain Could Affect Your Lover’s Sleep (www.medicaldaily.com)
  3. ^ wrote (ajcn.nutrition.org)
  4. ^ 4 Reasons You Should Be Drinking Bone Broth Every Day (www.medicaldaily.com)
  5. ^ 6 Foods You Think Are Vegetarian But Aren’t (www.medicaldaily.com)
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Who Should Take Gelatin Supplements? Could Aid Recovery From Sports Or Workout Injury, Strengthen Joints

We may associate gelatin with our favorite gummy snacks and Jello desserts, but new research[1] suggests there may be a health benefit to adding more of this animal byproduct to your diet. According to the research, now published the January issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, consuming a gelatin supplement, plus a burst of intensive exercise, can help build ligaments, tendons and bones.

The research found that gelatin supplement increased blood levels of amino acids and markers linked to collagen synthesis in human subjects and improved the mechanics of the engineered lab-grown ligaments. Those results led the team to determine that gelatin supplements may be helpful for athletes, elderly individuals, and others who may need more flexibility and joint support.

Read: Joint Pain Could Affect Your Lover’s Sleep[2]

“These data suggest that adding gelatin and vitamin C to an intermittent exercise program could play a beneficial role in injury prevention and tissue repair,” the researchers wrote[3].

gummy The main ingredient in our favorite gummy snacks may have an added health benefit. Photo Courtesy of Pixabay

For their study, the team analyzed both the effect of gelatin supplements on human volunteers, and on artificially grown ligaments to get a closer look at what was going occuring on inside of the body. A total of 8 healthy male volunteers drank a gelatin supplement enhanced with vitamin. Afterwards, the volunteers had their blood taken before and after performing short 5 minute intervals of high-impact exercises (skipping) for an hour .

The researchers believe their findings suggest that gelatin supplements may be useful prevent injury and enhance recovery.

Of course, one does not have to take supplement in order to get a more gelatin into their diet. Bone soups, which are made from boiling down either fish or animal bones, contain large amounts of gelatin as well, in addition to a variety of other important vitamins and nutrients. In addition to gelatin, bone broth also has collagen which also aids in skeletal support.

Source: Shaw G, Lee-Barthel A, Ross MLR, Wang B, Baar K. Vitamin C–enriched gelatin supplementation before intermittent activity augments collagen synthesis. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition . 2016

See Also:

4 Reasons You Should Be Drinking Bone Broth Every Day[4]

6 Foods You Think Are Vegetarian But Aren’t[5]

References

  1. ^ research (ajcn.nutrition.org)
  2. ^ Joint Pain Could Affect Your Lover’s Sleep (www.medicaldaily.com)
  3. ^ wrote (ajcn.nutrition.org)
  4. ^ 4 Reasons You Should Be Drinking Bone Broth Every Day (www.medicaldaily.com)
  5. ^ 6 Foods You Think Are Vegetarian But Aren’t (www.medicaldaily.com)