Tagged: Mass

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A Weight-Loss Expert Says You Should Eat These Snacks After Lifting Weights


POPSUGAR United Kingdom (blog)

A Weight-Loss Expert Says You Should Eat These Snacks After Lifting Weights
POPSUGAR United Kingdom (blog)
Because the two workouts are so different, the kind of food you eat right after a weighttraining session will be different than what you might eat after you do cardio. When you’re doing strength training, the goal is to build muscle mass, which will

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2 Experts Explain How Your Diet Needs to Change When You Lift Weights


POPSUGAR UK

2 Experts Explain How Your Diet Needs to Change When You Lift Weights
POPSUGAR UK
“It’s essential to know that nutrition has a significant impact on your results,” Dr. Luiza Petre, board-certified cardiologist and weight-management specialist, told POPSUGAR. If you’re lifting weights in an attempt to build muscle mass, Dr. Petre

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HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Today's Workout 139: 4 moves to lift, bend, and stretch your way to lean, lower-body muscle

Take your regular legs day routine up a notch by incoporating both cardio and yoga moves into the mix.

This rapid-fire, four-move routine focuses exclusively on your legs. Back-to-back rounds of barbell front squats and dumbbell sumo squats will build mass in your quads and hamstrings, jump squats will work to lean out your entire lower body, and a finishing wheel pose will stretch you out and help you recover.

Directions

You’ll do this workout as a circuit, meaning you’ll complete each exercise consecutively without rest. Once you’ve finished all exercises, rest for 60 to 90 seconds. Repeat the entire circuit for 4–6 rounds.

Depending upon your ability, you may shorten or lengthen the rest periods between circuits. You may also complete more or fewer rounds.

For more legs work:

Check out our favorite 10 workouts to do on legs day[1], our 15 exercises to develop the best glutes in the gym[2], and our five old-school legs workouts that’ll work forever[3].

For a complete archive of our daily quick-hit routines, go to mensfitness.com/todaysworkout[4].

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Build An Athletic Body With This Quickfire Home Dumbbell Circuit

You should know by now that you don’t need to spend hours slaving away in a gym to build a bigger, leaner and more functionally fit body. Indeed, more is often less when your training ambition is to look more like an athlete because you need to give your muscles the recovery time they need to adapt and grow.

But even though cutting down on your training time is the way to go when wanting a well-defined, athletic physique, you must also guarantee that what time you do spend training is 100% effective. That’s what this six-move total-body circuit offers – all you need is a pair of dumbbells and the right attitude, and you’ll get out of every session exactly what you put in. So start stripping away body fat and building new muscle mass today.

RECOMMENDED: The 4-Week Dumbbell Workout Plan To Build Muscle At Home[1]

How to do the workout

Do the six dumbbell exercises in order, sticking to the reps detailed, without resting until you finish all the reps of the sixth and final move of the circuit. Rest for two minutes, then repeat the circuit. Do four circuits in total.

Pick a dumbbell weight that allows you to perform the hardest lift for you with good form. Increase the weight weekly as you get stronger

1 Squat[2]

Reps 15 Rest 0sec

Stand tall with feet hip-width apart holding a dumbbell in each hand. Keep your chin and chest up. Brace your core, then bend at the hips and knees to squat down as low as you can. Push back up through your heels.

2 Alternating lunge[3]

Reps 12 each side Rest 0sec

Stand tall with feet hip-width apart holding a dumbbell in each hand. Keep your chin and chest up. Lunge forward and down until both knees are bent at right angles. Return to the start and alternate leading leg with each rep.

3 Overhead press[4]

Reps 12 Rest 0sec

Stand tall with feet hip-width apart, holding a dumbbell in each hand at shoulder height. Keep your chest up and brace your core. Press the weights directly overhead until your arms are fully extended, then lower them back to the start position.

4 Hammer curl[5]

Reps 12 Rest 0sec

Stand tall holding a dumbbell in each hand, with elbows by your sides and your chest and chin up. Keeping your elbows tight to your sides, curl the weights up together. Squeeze at the top, then lower under control.

5 Renegade row[6]

Reps 6 each side Rest 0sec

Get into a press-up position holding dumbbells. Brace your core and glutes to keep your body stable. Row one dumbbell up, leading with your elbow, then lower it back to the floor. Repeat, alternating arms with each rep.

6 Press-up[7]

Reps 15 Rest 2min

Get in the press-up position holding dumbbells. Brace your core and glutes to keep your body stable. Bend your elbows, keeping them close to your sides, to lower your chest to the floor. Press back up powerfully.

References

  1. ^ The 4-Week Dumbbell Workout Plan To Build Muscle At Home (www.coachmag.co.uk)
  2. ^ Squat (www.coachmag.co.uk)
  3. ^ Alternating lunge (www.coachmag.co.uk)
  4. ^ Overhead press (www.coachmag.co.uk)
  5. ^ Hammer curl (www.coachmag.co.uk)
  6. ^ Renegade row (www.coachmag.co.uk)
  7. ^ Press-up (www.coachmag.co.uk)
HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

No time to hit the gym? Just 1 or 2 workouts a week can be enough to stay in shape.

We get it: Sometimes a workout just isn’t in the cards.

Distractions creep in—a long meeting keeps you from the pile of work you’ve barely dented, a food- and booze-filled vacation saps your return-to-real-life motivation—and before you know it, it’s the end of the week and you’ve literally done squat…as in, not a single squat.

Well, don’t sweat it. Or, more accurately, do sweat it, but just once or twice a week, and you’ll still be able to keep yourself in the healthy lane, says a new study out of the University of Sydney[1] in Australia. 

Scientists at the school analyzed a mass of data on more than 60,000 people and discovered that active adults—including those who exercised only once or twice a week—had about a 30% lower risk of death from all causes than adults who pretty much never got off their asses. As long as they hit at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week, their health was measurably better.

By that criteria, just two nice, long runs or one gritty lifting session would meet the standard. And who can’t manage that?

“It’s very encouraging news that being physically active on just one or two occasions every week is associated with a lower risk of death,” said associate professor Emmanuel Stamatakis, Ph.D., in a press release[2].

Of course, he added, if optimal health is your goal, you’ll need to exercise considerably more than the minimum amount recommended—but we’re pretty sure you knew that already.

So don’t despair if you miss a few days; just try not to end any week without squeezing in a solid workout or two. And the next time you can’t manage one of the long, leisurely gym sessions you’re accustomed to, try one of these super-efficient routines to get your heart pumping and muscles firing fast[3].