Tagged: Diet

HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

2 Experts Explain How Your Diet Needs to Change When You Lift Weights


POPSUGAR UK

2 Experts Explain How Your Diet Needs to Change When You Lift Weights
POPSUGAR UK
“It’s essential to know that nutrition has a significant impact on your results,” Dr. Luiza Petre, board-certified cardiologist and weight-management specialist, told POPSUGAR. If you’re lifting weights in an attempt to build muscle mass, Dr. Petre

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HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Strictly Come Dancing’s Rev Richard Coles has shed a stone in weight — all because of his gruelling training schedule


The Sun

Strictly Come Dancing’s Rev Richard Coles has shed a stone in weight — all because of his gruelling training schedule
The Sun
STRICTLY’S Rev Richard Coles has lost a stone in just one month due to his tough training schedule. The vicar, 55, has been whipped into shape by 28-year-old pro dancer Dianne Buswell, who has also urged him to ditch his diet of cake and pork pies for …

HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Co Antrim man’s Mr Universe bid reliant on baby’s arrival


Belfast Live

Co Antrim man’s Mr Universe bid reliant on baby’s arrival
Belfast Live
So after a long conversation with his 35-year-old wife, Mark said they both agreed he would keep going. Since then he has been living and breathing weight training, cardio workouts and a super clean diet. “I do weight training six days a week, cardio

HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Emily’s 150-Pound Transformation Started With Meal Prep and a Low-Carb Diet


POPSUGAR United Kingdom (blog)

Emily’s 150-Pound Transformation Started With Meal Prep and a Low-Carb Diet
POPSUGAR United Kingdom (blog)
Now that I’m back in action at The Edge Fitness Club, I follow a strengthtraining routine developed by my trainer along with cardio, such as running or the StairMaster. And to change things up, I like to participate in group classes from time to time

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GREEK IFBB BODYBUILDER VALANTIS DOKOS

Muscle Ammiratore presents the Greek Bodybuilding Champion Valantis Dokos. 

Valantis lives in Germany and he works as a vet. Bodybuilding is his big love. He is an IFBB Competitive Athete. After June 2015, he decided to take some time off and this weekend ( September 29-30) he will take part in the biggest Czech Competition which will be the EVLS Prague Showdown. In a recent interview he said that he and his coach ( the famous worldwide Dennis James ) are very happy with the form he has managed to achieve plus the quality of the skin, cutting on the amount of carbs he has been using for his 12-week-diet. 

Valantis has recently created a new YouTube channel where he is trying to show us the right way of performing Bodybuilding workouts and training based on his experience. The quality and the professional way of editing his videos makes them so interesting, so we suggest that you subscribe, like and share his work following this link: 

See more of Valantis Dokos Bodybuilding career here: 


3rd Place Mr Olympia Amateur Spain up to 100kg 2015 

1st Place & Overall Winner at Greek IFBB Nationals 2014 

4rth Place at the Arnold Classic Amateur Spain up to 100kg

1st Place and Overall winner at the NRW IFBB Championship 2012

1st Place at the German IFBB International Championship up to 100 kg 2012
I wish Valantis all the best ! Support him in his career and if you talk to him say that  you got to know him from Muscle Ammiratore too! 
Follow Valantis here too : 

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How your DNA can reveal the perfect workout

We might like to think we’re brilliantly unique, but we share the majority of our DNA makeup with all the other humans on the planet, and slight genetic[1] variations make us who we are. Now, this information is being harnessed to help both athletes and the average Joe achieve their fitness potentials. 

This technology is the next step in the personalised fitness[2] dominated by Fitbits and other tracking devices. It is science that Olympic athletes including Greg Rutherford premier league football teams are said to swear by.

Most recently, health firm DNA Fit rolled out its Elevate software, which enables clients to access workouts built around their genetic coding on their smartphones and other devices.

To fetch this data, clients swab the inside of their mouths, and post off the cotton bud to the DNA Fit lab. There, technicians test for sensitivity to fats, lactose, gluten, carbohydrates, salt, alcohol and caffeine, among others things. A week or so later, a 25-page diet report and 15-page fitness rundown is sent back. 

As well as determining whether a person is particularly sensitive and prone to putting on weight after eating certain food groups, DNA markers can pinpoint if a person is more predisposed to training for endurance – such as cycling or running – or power – including weight lifting, high intensity resistance training and sprinting. Even details like the number of reps per exercise and recovery times are said to be lurking in our DNA. Trainers use this data to tailor efficient workouts and diets to help their client maximise their health.

The exercise it takes to burn off high-calorie foods – in pictures

“Thanks to the lowering cost of genotyping analysis researches studies are now possible at a fraction of the cost, this helps the science move forward,” DNA Fit founder, Avi Lasarow told The Independent. This is how the team informs the training plans with Elevate, he explains.

Nicholas Jones, the head of firm DNA Sports Performance, has worked with the England rugby and hockey teams and carried out studies into using genetic markers to enhance fitness at Lanchashire University. In a study on rowers published in the ‘Biology of Sport’ journal, Jones pinpointed whether participants fell into the endurance or power bracket. 

“If you match your genotype with your training the likelihood of significant improvement was 21 times more in the power test and 28.5 times more in endurance, test compared with people who were mismatched,” he told The Independent.

“Let’s flip that to yourself who’s just at the gym after Christmas and you want to get fit. You go to gym you and don’t see improvements. You don’t get more strong or powerful you get disgruntled and leave after four weeks. Whereas if you had done the genetic test you’d be much more likely to see the results you’re after quicker. You’re more likely to carry on in the gym as a result,” he argues. 

However, sceptics aren’t so convinced. Focusing on 45 of the 10million gene variants in the human body, as such tests do, gives only a small glimpse into our genetic profiles. 

“If you want to know how good someone is likely to be at sport, you’ll probably get a better idea by looking at them and their body shape,” Mark Thomas, professor of evolutionary genetics at University College London told The Telegraph. 

Maintaining a healthy diet is also key to hitting peak levels of performance.

“You have to think about environmental factors,” says Jones. “Take Team GB runner Mo Farah and his twin brother. Side by side you can see photos of them. His brother is quite overweight and isn’t a world class athlete. His environment has identical genes to Mo but his environment hasn’t allowed him to use the potential of the genes.” 

So, genetic test or no, at the end of the day none of us will become an Adonis without putting the hard work in at the gym. 

Reuse content[3]

References

  1. ^ genetic (www.independent.co.uk)
  2. ^ fitness (www.independent.co.uk)
  3. ^ Reuse content (www.independent.co.uk)