Monthly Archive: January 2017

HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Chisel Your Shoulders and Abs In Just 9 Minutes

With a 2 to 1 work to rest ratio, you’ll be incinerating calories too!

For more workouts that will light up your shoulders and abs, check out the new METASHRED EXTREME[1] transformation program from Men’s Health.

Directions: Perform the exercises below in the order listed for 40 seconds each, resting for 20 seconds between each movement.

1. Miniband superman

  1. Pushup and row
  2. Seated band forehead pull

That’s 1 round. Do 3 to 5 rounds.

References

  1. ^ METASHRED EXTREME (www.metashredextremedvd.com)
0

7 Minutes and 13 Moves Are All You Need for a Hard-Core Workout

One foolproof way to make the most out of a super-short workout[1]: Crank up the intensity. This HIIT workout will leave you drenched in sweat by working your entire body in just seven minutes. 



You might also like




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[2]

The cool thing about this workout is that it’s not made up of your standard (sometimes boring) push-ups and squats. Instead, the trainers offer a variety of dynamic exercises that will challenge muscles all over your body but also keep you engaged in the workout. Seven minutes will fly by! Because these moves are different from basic bodyweight exercises, it might take a minute to get the hang of them. Try quickly skimming through the video first to get an idea of each so you don’t waste any time when the clock is ticking. 

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To recap: An exercise mat is optional. Perform each exercise for 30 seconds with 10 seconds of rest in between. You’ll want a towel on hand. 

Workout:
1. Downward Dog to Upward Dog 
2. Alternating Reverse Lunge With Knee Drive
3. Burpee Variation to Low Squat 
4. Lying Starfish to V-Up With Clap
5. Y Pose With Thumbs Up
6. Squat Thrust to Bent Arm
7. Narrow Squat to Wide Squat to Alternating Split Lunge
8. Rocking Leg Lift to Jump-Through Push-Up
9. V-Up With Wide Leg
10. Skydive and Push-Up to Two-Point Plank 
11. Walk-Out Plank to Roll-Down Starfish 
12. Vertical Jump to Lateral Jump 
13. Plank Variation 

Looking for more short and effective at-home workouts? Grokker[3] has thousands of routines, so you’ll never get bored. Bonus: For a limited time, Greatist readers get 40 percent off Grokker Premium[4] (just $9 per month) and their first 14 days free. Sign up now[5]!

References

  1. ^ super-short workout (greatist.com)
  2. ^ {{displayTitle}} READ (greatist.com)
  3. ^ Grokker (grokker.com)
  4. ^ Grokker Premium (grokker.com)
  5. ^ Sign up now (grokker.com)
0

7 Minutes. 13 Moves. One HIIT Workout That’ll Make You Sweat

One foolproof way to make the most out of a super-short workout[1]: Crank up the intensity. This HIIT workout will leave you drenched in sweat by working your entire body in just seven minutes. 



You might also like




{{displayTitle}}


READ




[2]

The cool thing about this workout is that it’s not made up of your standard (sometimes boring) push-ups and squats. Instead, the trainers offer a variety of dynamic exercises that will challenge muscles all over your body but also keep you engaged in the workout. Seven minutes will fly by! Because these moves are different from basic bodyweight exercises, it might take a minute to get the hang of them. Try quickly skimming through the video first to get an idea of each so you don’t waste any time when the clock is ticking. 

[embedded content]

To recap: An exercise mat is optional. Perform each exercise for 30 seconds with 10 seconds of rest in between. You’ll want a towel on hand. 

Workout:
1. Downward Dog to Upward Dog 
2. Alternating Reverse Lunge With Knee Drive
3. Burpee Variation to Low Squat 
4. Lying Starfish to V-Up With Clap
5. Y Pose With Thumbs Up
6. Squat Thrust to Bent Arm
7. Narrow Squat to Wide Squat to Alternating Split Lunge
8. Rocking Leg Lift to Jump-Through Push-Up
9. V-Up With Wide Leg
10. Skydive and Push-Up to Two-Point Plank 
11. Walk-Out Plank to Roll-Down Starfish 
12. Vertical Jump to Lateral Jump 
13. Plank Variation 

Looking for more short and effective at-home workouts? Grokker[3] has thousands of routines, so you’ll never get bored. Bonus: For a limited time, Greatist readers get 40 percent off Grokker Premium[4] (just $9 per month) and their first 14 days free. Sign up now[5]!

References

  1. ^ super-short workout (greatist.com)
  2. ^ {{displayTitle}} READ (greatist.com)
  3. ^ Grokker (grokker.com)
  4. ^ Grokker Premium (grokker.com)
  5. ^ Sign up now (grokker.com)
HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Plantronics BackBeat FIT Review: Fantastic Wireless Headphones

I almost never run, cycle or do anything active without headphones (I’m sociable that way) and I’ve tried dozens of sets of wireless headphones. The Plantronics BackBeat FIT aren’t just good – they’re the first pair to finally convince me to give up my trusty wired Bose SoundSports when exercising.

The requirements of a set of wireless headphones[1] for sports are quite simple. They have to stay in your ear, be comfortable, have a decent battery life and sound good. However, I’ve found that most sets don’t hit even half of these targets. The BackBeat FIT delivers on every count, and throws in some extra features for good measure. And all for a very reasonable £70.40 on Amazon at time of writing[2] (RRP £99.99).

The lightweight headset is barely noticeable once on and didn’t shift at all over the course of a half marathon. The earbuds are not designed to be jammed right down into your ears, which I found far more comfortable than standard in-ear buds, and they also let in some ambient noise – always handy when running on busy roads.

The battery life is a healthy eight hours and every time your turn them on a voice notification tells you how many hours you have left. That’s an extremely useful feature and one that should be on all Bluetooth headphones. The BackBeat FIT charges fully in around 2½ hours, with a 15-minute quick charge delivering an hour of playback.

Given the ambient fit and modest price point, it’s perhaps not surprising the sound quality doesn’t quite match top-end headsets like the BEOPLAY H5, especially when it comes to bass. As someone who mostly listens to podcasts and embarrassing pop music when running, I value a comfortable fit far more than thundering bass, but for some it might not suffice.

The headset has controls for play and pause, and taking calls, although the latter will reduce the battery life by a couple of hours. The band is flexible and the whole caboodle is waterproof, which bodes well for its durability. A wide variety of colours is available and the headset also has some reflective detailing. It probably won’t be the difference between life and death when running at night, but every little helps.

Every time I tried to pair the BackBeat FITs with a device I had no problems connecting quickly – in fact, they turned out to be a little too good at this. It’s all too easy to turn the headset on accidentally when it’s in a rucksack and once on, it immediately connected to my phone, overriding the headphones I was wearing. It took a while to work out why my music had suddenly stopped.

Aside from that minor confusion, the BackBeat FIT was a joy to use, setting standards that I wish were met by far pricier Bluetooth headphones. Unless you’re an absolute bass fiend, or prefer an in-ear fit, it’s a fantastic headset at a very good price. plantronics.com[3]

References

  1. ^ wireless headphones (www.coachmag.co.uk)
  2. ^ £70.40 on Amazon at time of writing (www.amazon.co.uk)
  3. ^ plantronics.com (www.plantronics.com)
HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Study Shows Fitness Gym Membership Pays Health Benefits

AMES, Iowa- The New Year’s resolutions of weight loss and fitness can be better achieved if you have a gym membership, according to a new study from Iowa State University.

The study led by Duck-chul (DC) Lee, an assistant professor of Kinesiology at ISU said that people who belong to a health club exercised more, and had better heart health. The benefits are even greater if you have had a gym membership for over a year.

“It’s not surprising that people with a gym membership work out more, but the difference in our results is pretty dramatic,” Lee said, in a news release. “Gym members were 14 times more aerobically active than non-members and 10 times more likely to meet muscle-strengthening guidelines, regardless of their age and weight.”

Lee said it is recommended that adults get 150 minutes of moderate activity a week, and 75 minutes of vigorous activity.

“You have to do both aerobic and resistance exercise,” said Lee. “You can meet the aerobic exercise guidelines by doing exercise or physical activity outside like running bicycling, but meeting the resistance exercise guideline, it’s more difficult or challenging to do that outside the gym.

Exercise resistance is done by lifting weights, and differs from running or biking.

42.026619 -93.646465
HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

No time to hit the gym? Just 1 or 2 workouts a week can be enough to stay in shape.

We get it: Sometimes a workout just isn’t in the cards.

Distractions creep in—a long meeting keeps you from the pile of work you’ve barely dented, a food- and booze-filled vacation saps your return-to-real-life motivation—and before you know it, it’s the end of the week and you’ve literally done squat…as in, not a single squat.

Well, don’t sweat it. Or, more accurately, do sweat it, but just once or twice a week, and you’ll still be able to keep yourself in the healthy lane, says a new study out of the University of Sydney[1] in Australia. 

Scientists at the school analyzed a mass of data on more than 60,000 people and discovered that active adults—including those who exercised only once or twice a week—had about a 30% lower risk of death from all causes than adults who pretty much never got off their asses. As long as they hit at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week, their health was measurably better.

By that criteria, just two nice, long runs or one gritty lifting session would meet the standard. And who can’t manage that?

“It’s very encouraging news that being physically active on just one or two occasions every week is associated with a lower risk of death,” said associate professor Emmanuel Stamatakis, Ph.D., in a press release[2].

Of course, he added, if optimal health is your goal, you’ll need to exercise considerably more than the minimum amount recommended—but we’re pretty sure you knew that already.

So don’t despair if you miss a few days; just try not to end any week without squeezing in a solid workout or two. And the next time you can’t manage one of the long, leisurely gym sessions you’re accustomed to, try one of these super-efficient routines to get your heart pumping and muscles firing fast[3].

HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

You Don’t Need Any Equipment For This 2-Move Total-Body Workout

Trainer: Jeremy Scott, trainer at Jeremy Scott Fitness in Scottsdale, Arizona.

Benefit: Pushups work your chest, shoulders, triceps, and core. Squats challenge your glutes, hamstrings and quads. Combine the two with plyometric variations, and you’ll build total-body strength and power while melting fat, Scott says.

HardPuppy Fitness Gym 0

Narragansett studio offers mind, body workout to ‘older dancers’

NARRAGANSETT—It’s Thursday, 9:30 a.m., and most of the businesses at Mariner Square Plaza in Narragansett are not yet open. One, however, is already filled with life: The Studio. Behind its signature red door and handcrafted wooden sign on the window, several middle-age women have gathered for their ballet class. They are not destined to dance at the Bolshoi, nor are they practicing for a recital. But they are devoted and ready for class every week—motivated by their love of ballet and inspired by the passion of their teacher, Marilyn Smayda, owner and artistic director.

“Let’s go, let’s go,” Smayda beckons the women in the dressing room, who are eager to chat and catch up with each other’s lives. “Leave five minutes earlier next time,” she warns them with the smile of a good friend and the discipline of a drill sergeant. 

Dressed in everything from shrugs to leggings, each dancer dutifully rushes across the large wooden dance floor to her spot on the barre. Melodic strains of a waltz by Shostakovich fill the room and immediately the plié warm-up begins. “Motivational arms,” Smayda calls out. “Shoulders down, elbows up, follow your hands.” Ballet class has started, and Smayda is right where she belongs—at the helm.

Owning a studio with a niche for older dancers was not what Smayda had envisioned when she embarked on her ballet career at the tender age of nine. “I never wanted to teach,” she said. “I wanted to dance.”

In fact, Marilyn Miller of Snug Harbor wanted so desperately to be a professional dancer, that she dropped out of South Kingstown High School in 1959 to join the fledgling ballet company ‘American Festival Ballet’ (the seedling for Festival Ballet in Providence). My father was not happy, but my mother thought it might be good life experience,” recalled Smayda, whose exceptional talent had caught the attention of the company’s director. Sixteen-year-old Smayda boarded a plane for a 15-hour flight to Germany, her first time away from home. But Smayda soon realized that the chaos of performing throughout Europe left little time for her to develop her own skills as a dancer. The company was ill-prepared to nourish its dancers artistically, despite its talented corps de ballet and accomplished prima ballerina Sonia Arova, who had danced with Rudolf Nureyev. “The reality was awful,” said Smayda who, with the wisdom of a 74-year-old, believes that she should have gone to New York City to study ballet. 

One year later, Smayda came home disheartened. “I returned to Lydia Pettine’s [the Providence studio where Smayda had trained]. I went to the barre and said ‘I don’t want to do this anymore.’ ”

For 17 years, Smayda turned her back on dance. She finished high school, worked as a flight attendant, married and had a son. She earned her degree in Wildlife Management from the University of Rhode Island and settled in Jamestown, where she still resides. Although she had stopped dancing, she never stopped moving. 

While taking an aerobics class, Smayda met jazz dancer Erja Fischer, who noticed Smayda’s dancing skills and urged her to teach at her studio. After much coaxing, Smayda said, “I was dancing again and it felt great!”

Smayda took ballet seminars in New York City and completed the prestigious Vaganova course on the Russian style of ballet at Bryn Mawr College. 

With four women she had met with Fischer, Smayda formed a dance ensemble which performed in Rhode Island. But when Fischer closed her studio, Smayda knew she couldn’t stop again. She and her fellow dancers pooled their resources and incorporated a new business; The Studio was born in 1994.

Converting an old furniture store in Mariner Square was a concerted effort. “We all used our skills to re-furbish it,” said Smayda. The dance studio flourished, with each woman teaching her own specialty. Smayda focused on ballet and pointe, while her business partners each taught jazz, modern and tap. From children to adults, The Studio trained many aspiring dancers and coordinated dozens of recitals.

Eventually Smayda’s colleagues decided to pursue other interests, but Smayda retained full ownership. “I wanted to keep it going,” she said. By 2000, Smayda recognized a gradual shift in her student population. Children’s enrollment declined, but adults were steady. Ballet and special tap and jazz workshops all attracted diverse, mature dancers. From 20-somethings who wanted to continue their training…to middle-age women who had left dancing to start families…to older dancers who had always wanted to learn but had not had the chance—Smayda’s studio fits the bill.

“I think it fulfills a need for all of them that is hard to find elsewhere,” Smayda said. 

For 53-year-old mother of five, Connie Lind of North Kingstown, that need is both physical and mental. After a ballet class I am a new woman. I walk into class tired, harried and physically tense and when I leave I am relaxed and free,” said Lind.   

Lind, who started dancing at The Studio 10 years ago, has found that ballet in her middle age has been therapeutic for her problematic hips—affording her a “deep stretch” that other exercise could not achieve. “Ballet is a wonderful complement to my weekly exercise,” she said.

Lind has seen firsthand the all-encompassing benefits of dance in her life. “Ballet is good for my posture, my strength, my flexibility my focus and my peace of mind. It keeps my feeling younger and happier. And I love the camaraderie with my fellow dancers,” she said. “My life often seems too busy for ballet, and then I remind myself, I cannot imagine my life without ballet. So I pack my ballet bag and head out the door.”

Narragansett resident and Lind’s classmate Ann Zarrella did not begin dancing until she was 62, but like Lind, she has come to love the mind-body connection that dance enhances. 

“I had taken a yoga class, but it was not the right fit,” said Zarrella. “I called The Studio and told Marilyn I had absolutely no ballet experience. She encouraged me to try the class. I was hooked.”

Zarrella, who will turn 80 next month, believes that ballet gives her a complete workout. “We all know how important movement is to help slow the aging process,” she said.

“The Studio has provided a wonderful outlet for expressing my love of classical music,” said Zarrella. “The experience of meeting wonderful people is frosting on the cake. Marilyn is an outstanding dancer, teacher and an inspiration to those of us who are relatively new to the art form.”

Smayda is humble about her studio’s appeal. “We have wonderful teachers and the students work hard,” said Smayda. She is proud that her studio still promotes classical ballet in an era where many facilities have turned solely to competitive dance. “We take dance seriously. I think adults are drawn to teachers who have a passion and respect for what they’re teaching,” said Smayda, who jumps, pirouettes and stretches with the agility and flexibility of someone half her age.

Although The Studio still offers a handful of classes to young children, its mainstay is the older student. “It’s technique, music, conditioning for the whole body, mental therapy, a support group…it’s tough and it’s fun,” said Smayda. “Ballet has everything. I love all parts of it. And I don’t plan to stop now. I need this.”

The Studio offers ballet, pointe, tap, jazz and fitness classes for dancers of all levels. Visit thestudioatmarinersquare.com[1] or call 789-3029 for schedule and registration information. 

 

References

  1. ^ thestudioatmarinersquare.com (thestudioatmarinersquare.com)